Rosh Hashanah: Jews celebrate “sweet” New Year, begin High Holidays

Honey and biscuits

Honey is eaten with various foods on Rosh Hashanah. Photo courtesy of Pixnio

SUNSET SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 29: Rich dishes made with honey, paired with blasts from the shofar, mean it’s Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year—and it’s also the start of the High Holidays. Do you know someone who is Jewish? Wish him or her L’shanah tovah—“For a good year!”

On the first and second days of the Jewish month of Tishri, Rosh Hashanah is celebrated by Jews around the world. In Hebrew, Rosh Hashanah means “head of the year,” or “first of the year,” and many Jews use this period of time to make resolutions and commitments for self-improvement. Sins are “cast” into a river and honey is consumed for hopes of a sweet New Year.

NEWS: Jews of all ages have been making and finishing shofars prior to this year’s Rosh Hashanah, the Chicago Tribune reported. Read the article here.

On Rosh Hashanah, work is not permitted and many more traditional adherents spend the day in the synagogue. The shofar, a ram’s horn blown like a trumpet, is one of the holiday’s most famous symbols—but Rosh Hoshanah also comes with special readings and prayers for a good new year.

Traditionally, Jewish teaching associates Rosh Hashanah with the anniversary of the creation of Adam and Eve, and the day’s services focus on the relationship between G_d and humanity. (Learn more from Judaism 101.)

HONEY, APPLES AND BREAD: A SWEET NEW YEAR

Of the sweet foods consumed on Rosh Hashanah, none is more popular than honey. Jerusalem, biblically referred to as “the land of milk and honey,” is yet another reason to eat honey on this special holiday. Most Jews eat apples or bread dipped in honey, or create dishes that incorporates these ingredients.

tashlich, Rosh Hashanah

A tashlich ceremony in Israel. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Prayers near a body of water accompany the practice of tashlich, which is the “casting off” of sins. The faithful travel to flowing water and empty their pockets into the river, symbolically casting off their sins. Typically, small bits of bread are placed in the pockets before tashlich, and later “cast off” during the ritual.

What are the High Holidays? Sometimes referred to as “High Holidays,” or “High Holy Days,” this is the period of Hashanah and Yom Kippur and usually the phrase includes the 10 days in between. One description of this period says, in essence, that G_d opens the books of judgment as the new year begins and finally, on Yom Kippur, the judgment for the year is “sealed.”

EXTRAS: BRISKET AND HONEY

Fifteen traditions: Reader’s Digest reported 15 must-observe traditions for Rosh Hashanah this year.

Want to make a perfect brisket? It’s a holiday favorite in many Jewish homes, and FeedTheSpirit columnist Bobbie Lewis (with guest writer Debbi Eber) tackles the tips and techniques for a perfect brisket dinner.

Sweet recipes: Looking to bake up something sweet and scrumptious this Rosh Hashanah? Try the Jewish Chronicle’s honey cake trifle; Huffington Post’s 21 recipes with honey and apples; or forward.com’s granola baked apples. For an entire menu of Rosh Hashanah recipes, check out AllRecipes, Epicurious, Food Network and Martha Stewart.

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Categories: Jewish

Rosh Hashanah: Shanah Tovah, 5777!

wpid-2010_09_08_Rosh_Hashanah_treats.jpg

Honey, apples and pomegranates are common fare on Rosh Hashanah.

SUNSET SUNDAY OCTOBER 2: Sound the shofar and wish your neighbor L’shanah tovah: “For a good year!” It’s Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year—and it’s also the start of the High Holidays.

For two days, Jews around the world attend services, seek forgiveness and joyfully enter the annual High Holy Days. Sometimes called the Days of Awe, this period culminates in Yom Kippur, the solemn Day of Atonement, which starts at sunset on Tuesday, October 11 this year.

What are the High Holidays? Sometimes referred to as “High Holidays,” or “High Holy Days,” this is Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur and, often, the days in between the two holidays. One description of this period says, in essence, that G_d opens the books of judgment as the new year begins and finally, on Yom Kippur, the judgment for the year is “sealed.”

‘Trying Extra, Extra Hard to Get Along’

Every year, since its founding a decade ago, ReadTheSpirit magazine has covered the Jewish High Holy Days. Central themes are taking stock of the previous year, reconciling broken relationships, asking forgiveness and preparing for a better new year.  This year, we asked Jewish scholar and contributing writer Joe Lewis to write about his reflections as he approaches 5777. Joe writes …

I’ve been reading one of the complicated medieval acrostic poems added to the “additional” liturgy for Yom Kippur. Many people know that Jewish involves three daily liturgical units, with an extra one on special days such as holy days. The extra liturgical unit recalls the special sacrifices of a holy day in the time of the Temple.

On Yom Kippur, the extra liturgy includes several extra poems–extra extras. One of the longest and most complicated of these recalls the special sacrifices of Yom Kippur as outlined in the Mishnah, the early compilation of Jewish law and tradition. Even if he knew his duties well, the High Priest had to take a week-long refresher course and practice, practice, practice for the rituals of this day, with its immersions and changes of clothing and the tricky balancing of a pan of glowing coals in one hand and a ladle of incense in the other. Don’t try this at home!

What you can do at home is, like me, refresh your understanding of the ingeniously elliptical Hebrew poetry.

You might think I’m one of those people who’d like to see the Temple rebuilt. In its time, it was a world-wide tourist destination and well worth a visit; and none of us knows how its rituals might stir modern skeptical religious natures. Some think its time will come again, soon. Others, though, consider all references to the sacrificial system–even the “additional” liturgy through which it is recalled–outdated, even distasteful or downright primitive. I’m neither of those.

For me, the Temple ritual symbolizes a way of connecting with the divine. I can mourn its loss, and like any mourner can dwell on every memory I can recover, without wishing for its return. What’s more, the loss of the Temple ritual is a valuable symbol in itself. Unlike the many tragic sufferings forced on the Jewish people throughout our long history, it’s one tragedy that (our sages taught) we brought upon ourselves through causeless hatred.

The weeks leading up to Yom Kippur are a time to make peace for offenses between people; then we can seek God’s forgiveness for our sins with hearts free of bitterness. Dwelling on the loss of our ancient form of prayer should remind us that unless we make peace–with our neighbor whose lawn sign offends us, with our more distant neighbors whose neighborhood we find unfamiliar and consider enviable or unsafe, with neighboring peoples whose intentions we fear and mistrust–we can lose all that we cherish.

There’s no better time to try extra, extra hard to get along with others!

APPLES AND HONEY FOR A ‘SWEET’ NEW YEAR

Apples and muffins on wood

Photo courtesy of Pixabay

For Rosh Hashanah, honey and apples are the most famous holiday foods in the United States; other foods, including dates and pomegranates, have ancient associations with the New Year and still are enjoyed in Jewish communities around the world. The honey-and-apples symbol, often seen on holiday cards and other Rosh Hashanah media, is a reminder of the joy in welcoming a “sweet” new year.

Literally “head of the year,” Rosh Hashanah was never referred to by name in the Bible. Instead, references in Leviticus were made to Yom Teruah, the day of the sounding of the shofar. There are many stories and lessons associated with the blowing of the shofar now, but the Bible does not clearly explain the symbol. In the synagogue, 100 notes are blown each day of the New Year festivities; some refer to this noise as a “call to repentance.” Traditionally, Jewish teaching associates Rosh Hashanah with the anniversary of the creation of Adam and Eve.

A lesser-known Jewish tradition related to Rosh Hashanah is tashlikh, or “casting off.” After filling their pockets—most often with small bits of bread—devotees walk to flowing water and empty their pockets, thereby symbolically “casting off” the sins of the old year.

Sweet recipes: Looking to bake up something sweet and scrumptious this Rosh Hashanah? Try Huffington Post’s 21 recipes with honey and apples or a Rosh Hashanah honey cake courtesy of the New York Times. For an entire menu of Rosh Hashanah recipes, check out Chabad.org, AllRecipes, Epicurious, Food Network and Martha Stewart.

IN THE NEWS: COSTCO, AN EASY RH DINNER & A FREE EBOOK

Think that pomegranates and some of the other exotic fruits of Rosh Hashanah are difficult to find? My Jewish Learning checks out Costco, and lists several sweet treats available at the chain of superstores.

Preparation for Rosh Hashanah doesn’t have to be an arduous task, says the Jewish Telegraphic Agency: Here are some tips for the “easiest Rosh Hashanah dinner ever.”

Free holiday cookbook: One of the fresh links we spotted this year is a tasty e-book of holiday recipes from My Jewish Learning. Here’s a link to download the book. Recipes include Pomegranate and Honey Glazed Chicken, plus Apple Kugel Crumble Cake.

 

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Categories: Jewish

Rosh Hashanah: Preparing for the (sweet) Jewish New Year 5776

Down on plate with Jewish writing on it, bowl of honey surrounded by three red apples

Apples and honey are traditional fare on Rosh Hashanah. Photo by Jeremy Price, courtesy of Flickr

SUNSET SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 13: Blasts from the shofar and rich dishes made with honey mean it’s Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year—and it’s also the start of the High Holidays.

On the first and second days of the Jewish month of Tishri, Rosh Hashanah is celebrated by Jews around the world. In Hebrew, Rosh Hashanah means “head of the year,” or “first of the year,” and many Jews use this period of time to make resolutions and commitments for self-improvement. Sins are “cast” into a river and honey is consumed for hopes of a sweet New Year.

Do you know someone who is Jewish? Wish him or her L’shanah tovah—“For a good year!”

On Rosh Hashanah, work is not permitted and many more traditional adherents spend the day in the synagogue. The shofar, a ram’s horn blown like a trumpet, is one of the holiday’s most famous symbols—but Rosh Hoshanah also comes with special readings and prayers for a good new year.

Traditionally, Jewish teaching associates Rosh Hashanah with the anniversary of the creation of Adam and Eve, and the day’s services focus on the relationship between G_d and humanity. (Learn more from Judaism 101.)

HONEY AND STONES: A SWEET NEW YEAR AND TASHLICH

Rosh Hashana card from early 20th Century

An elaborate Rosh Hashanah greeting card from a century ago from the collection of the Jewish Museum in New York City.

Of the sweet foods consumed on Rosh Hashanah, none is more popular than honey. Jerusalem, biblically referred to as “the land of milk and honey,” is yet another reason to eat honey on this special holiday. Most Jews eat apples or bread dipped in honey, or create dishes that incorporates these ingredients. (Wikipedia has details.)

Prayers near a body of water accompany the practice of tashlich, which is the “casting off” of sins. The faithful travel to flowing water and empty their pockets into the river, symbolically casting off their sins. Typically, small bits of bread are placed in the pockets before tashlich, and later “cast off” during the ritual.

What are the High Holidays? Sometimes referred to as “High Holidays,” or “High Holy Days,” this is the period of Hashanah and Yom Kippur and usually the phrase includes the 10 days in between. One description of this period says, in essence, that G_d opens the books of judgment as the new year begins and finally, on Yom Kippur, the judgment for the year is “sealed.”

Shofar on white background

A shofar. Photo by The Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life, courtesy of Flickr

IN THE NEWS: A SHOFAR VISIT

For decades, rabbis and volunteers have been bringing the sound of the shofar to those who cannot attend synagogue services, whether due to age, poor health or occupation. Though driving a car is not permitted on holidays for traditionally observant Jews, some of these “house-call” shofar blowers are willing to walk for hours to add this important holiday element. (Chabad.org reported.) Jews: To request a home visit on Rosh Hashanah, contact your local Chabad Center.

Beatles ticket to an Israeli concert that never happenedThe Beatles in Israel? One of the most fascinating historical stories about Israel published as the year 5775 draws to a close is this lengthy column by Jewish Press writer Saul Jay Singer about a Beatles concert that might have taken place in 1965—but never did. Among other intriguing details about the ill-fated show, Singer found a ticket that promoters printed in preparation for the concert. The Beatles are on our minds, here at ReadTheSpirit, after the recent OurValues series by Charles Honey about the band’s enduring influence in our lives. Seems like an appropriate set of holiday dots to connect: Honey, the Beatles and Israel, too?

Want to make a perfect brisket? It’s a holiday favorite in many Jewish homes and, this week, FeedTheSpirit columnist Bobbie Lewis (with guest writer Debbi Eber) tackle the tips and techniques for a perfect brisket dinner.

Sweet recipes: Looking to bake up something sweet and scrumptious this Rosh Hashanah? Try the Jewish Chronicle’s honey cake trifle; Huffington Post’s 21 recipes with honey and apples; or forward.com’s granola baked apples. For an entire menu of Rosh Hashanah recipes, check out AllRecipes, Epicurious, Food Network and Martha Stewart.

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Categories: Jewish