Would you attend this Hunger Games camp?

So, this happened earlier this week.

Hunger Games Camp in Largo, Fla Has Some Concerned

(Oh! I went to post the link to the original Hunger Games Camp story on MSN.com and the video was gone! The point of the video is  the event organizer explaining the team-building, life-gaining activities at the camp.)

I was about to say – “that’s so COOL!”, but my husband was all, “can YOU beLIEVE this? A summer camp that glorifies kids killing other kids?”

But, he’d only read the headline – so I explained to him that it’s all team-building stuff – not a single paintball gun or Nerf arrow in sight. (Do they make Nerf arrows? If not, they should. I’d totally be onboard with those!)

I understand his concern, though. He’s seen the movie. It’s graphic. The deaths are deplorable and violent. (The Huffington Post picked up the story and had this to say about it.) This is my primary problem with movies. When I’m reading a book I don’t “see” the blood. I register that a character died, but I don’t invest my imagination in the details – and if the book is particularly graphic, I’ll even skip a few sentences so I don’t have to carry that image in my head. In the books the story does not drown in the deaths. In the books we hear lead character Katniss’ thoughts as she navigates this horrifying world, trying to avoid both killing and being killed. Knowing she is suffering somehow makes our suffering  as observers easier to bear.

What the Hunger Games is truly about, beyond the gory-kid-on-kid-murderous-violence, is justice.

lovejusticeTwo of the main characters, Katniss and Gale, have been deeply aware since an early age that injustice rules their lives. Their fathers died in a mine explosion. While their mothers are doing the best they can,  each has had to take on responsibility beyond their years to keep food on the table. Their childhoods were sacrificed because the government sees them as expendable.

Once in the arena, another main character, Peeta, declares he will not play the government’s game. He will preserve justice within himself. He nearly dies following that decision while leading predatory contestants away from Katniss and helping her to escape when she was trapped.

The camp I want to attend would  have a section on food foraging and survival skills. And archery. Because at some level I think  everyone wants to be Katniss. But if I were to organize a Hunger Games camp I would emphasize the need to be just in order to bring about justice in our world. We would talk about regional crops and food justice, bullying, institutional racism, and team building with people who are “other” than us.

I think the deeper story in The Hunger Games can be summed up by Micah 6:8 “He has shown you, O mortal, what is good. And what does the LORD require of you? To act justly and to love mercy and to walk humbly with your God.”

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