Gardening brings joy, if we are smart about adapting

Heather Jose photo.

Heather Jose

Gardening makes me happy.

I love watching things grow, digging in the dirt, moving things around. I don’t even mind pulling weeds. I have mentioned in past columns that I am not the only gardener in my family. In fact my grandma and my husband’s grandfather have bonafide green thumbs.

Through this column, we put the word out a couple of weeks ago that we were looking for caregiving tips we all can use in spring and summer. A number of ideas focused on gardening. Today, I’m going to share my tips and a couple from our readers.

Thanks to Edy Brown for this tip: "We can learn a lot from traditional gardening around the world. Smart housekeepers plant herb gardens in containers they can maintain without stooping over. This example is from Laos. Lots of herbs, onions and other useful crops can be planted in containers you've already got in the garage or basement."

Thanks to Edy Brown for this tip: “We can learn a lot from traditional gardening around the world. Smart housekeepers plant herb gardens in containers they can maintain without stooping over. This example is from Laos. Lots of herbs, onions and other useful crops can be planted in containers you’ve already got in the garage or basement. You can re-purpose many plastic, metal and other containers. I’ve even seen several container tomatoes grown together in a children’s wading pool.”

People who don’t share the love of gardening don’t always understand the draw to be out in the fresh air making sure everything is the way you like it. But it isn’t as easy with age. As our grandparents have aged I have observed a few things.

1. Telling a gardener not to worry about their garden is not going to work. They care about their plants and want them to look good and flourish. That means risking a fall or a sore body in order to keep up with the maintainence required. Try to see these plantings through the gardener’s eyes: An unruly flower bed may make no difference to you, but it can be deeply troubling to the gardener whose loving labor originally planted it.

2. If you are assisting a gardener with the tasks that need to be done, please make sure you are doing what is important to them and to their standards if at all possible. When my grandma had to stop mowing and weeding it drove her crazy when others blew the lawn clippings into the flower beds and flowers were pulled instead of weeds due to lack of knowledge.

3. Less can be more as we grow older. My grandfather is the ‘Tomato Man’ at his large assisted living residence. Having once had a huge garden, he now sticks to a small space and grows only tomatoes that everyone wants to be the recipient of. It satisfies him and his need to garden.

4. Raised beds are a good thing. They can be built at all levels, allowing accessibility to those in wheelchairs or people with walkers that have seats built in to sit and garden. Take a look at the photo from Laos that a reader recommended, today.

5. Even a small container that grows herbs can be satisfying to a gardener. And growing things is good for the soul.

LEARN FROM AN EXPERT:
PATTY CASSIDY

Gardening for Seniors by Patty CassidyA couple of readers recommended books by Patty Cassidy. She is one of the nation’s best-known horticultural therapists as both a master gardener and counselor with years of experience with seniors. She occasionally shows up in the New York Times as an expert on these issues.

We recommend her very practical and beautifully illustrated book with a long title: The Illustrated Practical Guide to Gardening for Seniors: How to maintain your outside space with ease into retirement and beyond (although you’ll only find it for sale by re-sellers at this point) and her newer book The Age-Proof Garden: 101 practical ideas and projects for stress-free, low-maintenance senior gardening, shown step by step in more than 500 photographs.

In Patty’s view from her website: “Tending our gardens is a lifelong pleasure. As we age, our energy and physical abilities become more limited, but gardens are magical, evolving places, with the potential to keep us young at heart and physically fit.” So she—and other experts in adapted gardening—focus on choosing lower-maintenance plantings, adjusting the location and height of beds, choosing gardening tools designed for people with a range of disabilities.”

SHARE YOUR TIPS

Are you a gardener or do you take care of someone who is? Tell us your favorite thing to grow or leave us a tip that has helped you through the years. We’d even welcome a photo from a corner of your garden that you especially enjoy. Contact us at ReadTheSpirit@gmail.com

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