St. Patrick’s Day: History, recipes and his famous Breastplate prayer

Girl with red hair in traditional Irish dress in dark blue

An Irish dancer at an earlier St. Patrick’s Day Parade in San Francisco. Photo by Mark, courtesy of Flickr.

FRIDAY, MARCH 17: So, what’s a good Irish Catholic to do on this convergence of St. Patrick’s day with the Church’s tradition of abstaining from meat on Fridays in Lent?

After all, tender corned beef is a traditional staple of the holiday! That’s not to mention plenty of beer—and Lenten Fridays are meant to be a time of prayerful self-denial.

Well, since this collision of observances rolls around approximately every seven years, many Catholic bishops anticipated the dilemma and already have issued 2017 dispensations to allow a hearty holiday meal. But, consider: Bishops like Robert C. Morlino of Madison, Wisconsin, also are cautioning Catholics to “exercise due moderation and temperance in festivities and celebrations of the memorial of St. Patrick, in keeping with the solemnity and honor that is due to so great a saint and his tireless efforts to inspire holiness in the Christian faithful.” That’s according to a report on the corned beef dilemma by Catholic News Service.

If you are concerned, check local news reports. More bishops are chiming in with dispensations as the holiday approaches.

A DREAM AND A SHAMROCK

The legendary patron saint of Ireland began life c. 385 CE, in Roman Britain. With a wealthy family whose patron was a deacon, the young man who would become known as St. Patrick led a comfortable life until his teenage years, when he was kidnapped and taken as a slave to Gaelic Ireland. During his six years in Ireland, Patrick gained a deeper Christian faith. When he dreamed that God told him to flee to the coast, Patrick did so—and traveled home to become a priest. (Wikipedia has details.) Following ordination, however, another dream prompted Patrick to do what no one expected: to return to Ireland.

As a Christian in Ireland, Patrick worked to convert the pagan Irish. With a three-leaved shamrock in hand to explain the Holy Trinity to the pagans, St. Patrick converted many. St. Patrick died on March 17, 461 at Downpatrick.

St Patrick in stained glassSurprisingly, the most widely known saint from Ireland was never formally canonized by the Catholic Church. Since no formal canonization process existed in the Church’s first millennium, St. Patrick was deemed a saint only by popular acclaim and local approval.

ST. PATRICK’S ‘BREASTPLATE’

One of the most popular posts in the decade-long history of ReadTheSpirit is a collection of three versions of the famous prayer known as The Breastplate. Start here for a Gaelic version and follow the link to find two more English versions, one as poetry and one as refashioned for a hymn.

Nonetheless, St. Patrick’s Day was made an official Christian feast day by the early 17th century, observed by the Catholic Church, Eastern Orthodox Christians, Lutherans and members of the Church of Ireland. Today, countries the world over offer citizens and tourists Irish-themed foods, drinks and culture on March 17. Dances, processions, performances and more illustrate the vibrancy of Irish history—all set against the very Irish color of green.

Skillet pan with pot pie vegetables and meat in gravy and potatoes braised and mashed on top

Beef and lamb shepherd’s pie for St. Patrick’s Day. Photo by Dennis Wilkinson, courtesy of Flickr

RECIPES, CRAFT IDEAS AND MORE

Who doesn’t dream of hearty Irish stews, hot Reuben sandwiches and cold drinks on St. Patrick’s Day? Get into the Irish spirit with these recipe ideas (and some crafts, to boot):

  • A plethora of easy-to-follow recipes, from brisket to soda bread, is at AllRecipes.
  • Kids can get into the spirit of the Irish with craft ideas from PBS and Parenting.com.
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