Hoping the weather cooperates for Sukkot

Zayda Joe Lewis gets help decorating the sukkah.

Zayda Joe Lewis gets help decorating the sukkah.

 

I should be thinking about the meaning of the Jewish holiday of Sukkot that started last night. Instead I’m fretting about the weather.

The Jewish religious calendar is unique in that it is both lunar and seasonal. Months have 28 or 29 days. This means that over the years, the religious dates get out of whack with the secular—and natural—calendar.

Muslims also follow a lunar calendar, but their holidays aren’t connected to the physical seasons–so Ramadan and other holidays can occur at any time of the year.

The Jewish calendar uses a system that adds a “leap month” seven times in 19 years  a second month of Adar, which usually occurs around February — to keep holidays and seasons in their traditional relationship. For example, it wouldn’t make sense for either of the two Jewish harvest festivals—Sukkot in the fall and Shavuot in the spring—to wander through the seasons. It’s hard to celebrate a harvest in January, even in balmy Israel.

Holidays are “late” after a leap year

Last year was a leap year, so everything was pushed back 28 days compared to last year. That means this year, the fall Jewish holidays were “late”–Rosh Hashanah didn’t start until October 3, just a few days earlier than the latest date it can possibly be.

Apartment dwellers can build a sukkah on a balcony. Photo by Katie Chao and Ben Mussig via Flickr Creative Commons.

Apartment dwellers can build a sukkah on a balcony. Photo by Katie Chao and Ben Mussig via Flickr Creative Commons.

This wouldn’t be a problem except for the festival of Sukkot, which began this year at sundown on October 16.

The holiday doesn’t celebrate only the fall harvest. Mainly, it commemorates the 40 years when the Israelites wandered in the desert after the exodus from Egypt. Wherever they camped, they lived in temporary structures, and so on this holiday, we build little huts in our backyards, on our patios or even on our balconies.

These huts are called “sukkot” (singular “sukkah”), often translated as “booths,” which, frankly, I never understood since, while small, they are much larger than phone booths, voting booths or restaurant booths.

We usually interpret the command to “live” in these huts as meaning we take many of our meals in them.

Michigan weather a challenge

In Israel this isn’t much of a problem, but in Michigan, and much of the U.S., it can get pretty darn cold in mid-October, especially after sundown when most of us eat our main meal. And when it rains, eating in the sukkah is just out of the question; the sukkah is supposed to be covered with organic material such as pine boughs, reeds or bamboo, and one is supposed to be able to see the stars through the roof. Unfortunately a roof that lets in a view of the stars also lets in whatever moisture falls from the heavens.

The weatherman is forecasting a high in the low 70s for Sunday in our part of the U.S. Perfect! But they’re also forecasting rain. So while I purchased fancy plastic plates to use in the sukkah, I’ll also be setting my dining room table. In mid-October, you just don’t know!

One thing I will be doing is serving my famous stuffed cabbage, which I make every year at this time. It’s traditional to celebrate the fall harvest by eating stuffed vegetables, a symbol of bounty.

Last year I gave you a recipe for Armenian stuffed grape leaves. Today I offer a nice recipe for apple-stuffed acorn squash. I modified it slightly from a recipe I found on www.food.com, where it was posted by Elana’s Pantry.

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Apple-stuffed Acorn Squash

Apple-stuffed Acorn Squash

Ingredients

  • 2 small to medium acorn squashes
  • boiling water
  • 2 apples, peeled, cored and chopped into ¼-inch pieces
  • ½ cup dried cranberries
  • 1 tsp. cinnamon
  • 2 Tbs. butter, margarine, grapeseed oil or coconut oil

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Cut squash in half and remove pulp and seeds with a spoon. You may need to cut a very thin slice off the bottom to make it stand flat.
  3. Place the squash halves cut-side down in a large Pyrex baking dish.
  4. Pour ½ inch of boiling water (or apple cider) into the dish.
  5. Bake the squash for 30 minutes.
  6. While squash is baking, combine the apples, cranberries, cinnamon and butter or oil.
  7. After 30 minutes, remove the squash, turn the halves over, and fill the center of each with the apple mixture, packing it down. Cover loosely with foil.
  8. Add a little more boiling water to the pan if necessary.
  9. Bake another 30 minutes. Test to see if the squash is gone by piercing it with a toothpick or skewer; it should go in easily.
  10. Remove the foil and bake another 10 minutes, or longer if necessary to get the squash soft.
http://www.readthespirit.com/feed-the-spirit/sukkot2016/

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